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The marginalized quarters of Rome

From Roman times, when it remained the last outpost of Etruscan resistance, Trastevere has always been, as its very name states, “beyond the Tiber”, detached from the city proper.  Over the centuries, it has been populated by all of the marginalized people of the city and by travellers, becoming a cosmopolitan quarter. And it was on its streets, precisely in Largo Argentina, that Julius Caesar was killed. The Jewish Ghetto, the second oldest in the world, remained a quarter where the Roman Jews were constrained to live from 1555 to 1870, when they were finally recognized as equal to the rest of the population. The “Renaissance Quarter”, that of the Roman forums, was also abandoned for a time, becoming swampy, until the Renaissance when it was drained and rebuilt, and with its artisan bottegas becoming one of the most unique and best-loved areas in Rome.